Angel Oak - 700 year old White Oak in Charleston, SC
Thin Places Travel Tips - how tos

How to Talk to Trees

Angel Oak - 700 year old White Oak in Charleston, SC
Angel Oak – 700-year-old White Oak in Charleston, SC

Learn How to Talk to Trees in 5 Easy Steps

You don’t have to be smart to learn how to talk to trees. You have to be in tune and able to feel a connection to nature. There is a natural connection between trees and humans. And humans of all cultures have been talking to trees for a long long time.

I’ve been talking to trees since I was a kid. We had these three great big oaks in our backyard in Riverdale, and I’d talk to them. My mother always thought that I was talking to myself, and I’m certain that she thought I was crazy.

But let’s face it. Lots of kids talk to trees. Maybe children in their innocence sense or feel the trees reaching out to be recognized, and it feels natural to talk to trees. The kids don’t know any better. But once the children are conditioned (by adults) to know that talking to trees is seen as crazy behavior that will draw public ridicule – from parents, teacher, and peers – they stop talking. And later, when as adults they feel drawn to talk to a tree, they have to relearn the process that once came so naturally. And they still live in a world that is likely to criticize. 

All of those critical thinkers who are so eager to wave the finger of judgment at tree talkers should try talking to a tree. They might learn something.   

Tree roots growing up over boulder in Finistere forest, Brittany France
Tree roots growing up over a boulder in a Finistere forest, Brittany France

Think about the tree and its roots growing down into the earth and across the land. The roots pulling what the tree needs for survival out of the earth. All plants do this, of course. But the trees seem to magnify that divine process in such a way that it’s easy for us to see it. Trees pulse with the divine presence – – that entity that some of us know as God or the creative force. We pulse with it two. So the process of coming together by “talking” seems sensible.  

For those who may not know where to start, here are five easy step for talking to trees.

Step One: Find a Tree

It may seem silly as a first step, but a tree that wants connection will reach out to your intuition and let you know that is it present to you. You’ll sense it if you pay attention. It could be a tree you see on a forest walk.  It could be a sapling that you’re watering in your garden. Make the mental connection. 

The King Oak in Charleville Forest - County Offaly, Ireland
The King Oak in Charleville Forest – County Offaly, Ireland

Step Two:  Notice the Details

Put yourself clearly in that moment, in that place, with that tree.  Notice its bark, the patterns on the trunk, the shape of the leaves, the leaves that the tree has shed. The branches… are they thick, thin? What are the patterns in the canopy spread? What are the sounds you’re hearing?  What are scents in the air? 

700-year-old Spanish Chestnut. Inchmahome Woodland, Scotland
700-year-old Spanish Chestnut. Inchmahome Woodland, Scotland

Step Three:  Touch the Tree

Oh… this is the best part.  Reach out and touch that beautiful that you’ve been assessing.  Send it energy. Receive its energy. Feel the healing power that the tree imparts. In your mind, thank the tree for connecting with you. Send warm thoughts. 

To amplify this connection (though it’s not necessary), sit down and put your back against the tree. Imagine that you’re part of the tree and that your feet are connected to its roots and the branches are ascending from your own head or crown chakra. 

Beech trees at Monaincha, County Tipperary, Ireland
Beech trees at Monaincha, County Tipperary, Ireland

Step Four:  Ask the Tree a Question

It doesn’t matter what kind of question. It can be as simple as “What should I make for dinner tonight?” or “Which bill should I pay first this month?” Or you question could be more serious like  “Should I buy that house?” or “Should I end the relationship?” Don’t be afraid to ask deep questions such as “How can I bear this sense of loss I’m feeling right now?” or “Why am I such a failure when it comes to ________?”

If it’s your first time talking to a tree, I suggest sticking to the simpler questions.  

Monkey Puzzle Tree in Glenstal Abbey Forest, County Limerick, Ireland
Monkey Puzzle Tree in Glenstal Abbey Forest, County Limerick, Ireland

Step Five: Wait for the Answer

This isn’t really a step. It’s a natural progression from Step 4: Ask the Tree a Question.  If you are in tune and listening internally, the answers will come to you. You’ll hear that motherly or fatherly voice inside you whisper the answers. We connect mentally and spiritually. 

Yew Tree at Kylemore Abbey, Connemara, Ireland
Yew Tree at Kylemore Abbey, Connemara, Ireland

The answers often come quickly.  Don’t fight it. Let the tree’s answers to your question flow into mind. Try not to stop and analyze or let yourself doubt and wonder if the whole process is real.  

Just let the answers flow into your mind heart. 

And remember, people have been talking to trees since the beginning of recorded history. It’s a natural human tendancy. We are drawn to them … and maybe that’s because the divine presence within them is drawing us to them. Perhaps they have much to teach us. 

 

Closing the Connection

Once you’re finished talking to the tree, close the communication by thanking it and sending it warm energy and love. Conversation closure is important in all communications – human to human and human to tree.  

The Dark Hedges. Beech Trees in County Antrim, Ireland
The Dark Hedges. Beech Trees in County Antrim, Ireland

I’m writing this post on Earth Day.  Remeber, it’s okay to hug the tree. But if you’re sensitive to the criticism of others, you might want to wait until no one is looking. [smile]

Tree at St. Gobnait's Holy Well in Ballyvourney, County Cork
Tree at St. Gobnait’s Holy Well in Ballyvourney, County Cork

 

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2 Comments

  1. Dear Travel Hag
    Great articles on “trees” and “talking to trees” ! The spirituality of trees is haunting and mysterious, divine, and natural. Thank you for celebrating divine siblings.